Squirrels
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If you have any concerns about the well-being of your squirrel, make an urgent appointment with a vet. Be warned: many are indifferent or intolerant towards grey squirrels (and often wildlife in general). However, vets are obliged under the Guide to Professional Conduct Edition 2002 to treat any animal in distress. If necessary, remind your vet of this!

One of the main reservations vets have about admitting squirrels is that they donít want to be left with the creature. Some rather archaic laws concerning grey squirrels in the UK still make it an offence to release one back into the wild. Therefore make a big point when you make your appointment and when you see the vet, to assure them that you will be taking the squirrel away to pass on to an experienced carer/sanctuary. Otherwise there is a likelihood that the squirrel will be euthanised, regardless of its health.

Do not let a vet euthanise a squirrel unless you are sure that its chances of recovery are very slim. We have experience of some vets taking this option to save themselves work or expense.

What About Payment?

Whilst a vet cannot force you to pay for treatment to a wild animal, we advise that you offer some payment. Our own vet charges for drugs, but not for his time. Basically, explain that you are willing to make a contribution and be prepared to compromise.

We appreciate feedback about vets, especially if you have found one who is really sympathetic to squirrels, as we are trying to build up a national network of carers and vets.

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